Viagra Could Reduce Alzheimer’s Risk by Nearly One-Fifth

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Viagra Could Reduce Alzheimer's Risk by Nearly One-Fifth

Viagra Could Reduce Alzheimer’s Risk by Nearly One-Fifth

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by Wikikenko.com

in

Medications like Viagra aren’t just for treating erectile dysfunction. According to a recent study published in the journal “Neurology,” they might also offer another benefit: a lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

Study Overview

Research suggests that medications used to treat erectile dysfunction may lower the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Scientists conducted a new analysis, the results of which were published in “Neurology,” examining data from approximately 270,000 men. At the study’s onset, the average age of participants was 59 years, and they had recently been diagnosed with erectile dysfunction. Among them,

  • 55 percent were taking medications,
  • while 45 percent were not.

Over the course of five years, participants were observed. At the beginning of the study, none of the participants exhibited memory problems. During the study period, the following numbers of Alzheimer’s cases were observed:

  • 749 cases among those taking medications (8.1 cases per 10,000 person-years),
  • 370 cases among those not taking medications (9.7 cases per 10,000 person-years).

Person-years represent both the number of study participants and the time each participant spends in the study.

Key Findings

Upon accounting for other factors that could affect Alzheimer’s rates, such as age, smoking status, and alcohol consumption, researchers found that individuals taking medications for erectile dysfunction had an 18 percent lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s compared to those not taking medications. The association was strongest among those who received the most prescriptions during the study period.

It’s important to note that the study does not prove that medications for erectile dysfunction reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s; it merely highlights an association.

Expert Insights

The results are promising because developing new Alzheimer’s medications is a complex and costly endeavor. “This process can take many years,” explains Leah Mursaleen, Research Leader at Alzheimer’s Research UK, to the British Science Media Center. “The prospect of repurposing medications already approved for other health conditions could help expedite progress and open new avenues for preventing or treating dementia-causing diseases.” However, she also stresses that the study does not establish a causal relationship.

Tara Spires-Jones, President of the British Neuroscience Association, also expressed positivity about the findings. “The study was well conducted, and the authors appropriately interpreted the data,” she says. While the data do not definitively prove that medications reduce Alzheimer’s risk, they “provide good evidence that this type of medication is worth further investigation in the future.”

Preventive Measures for Alzheimer’s

We have compiled twelve risk factors that everyone can focus on to prevent Alzheimer’s. These tips are extracted from the brochure “Preventing Alzheimer’s – Living Healthily, Aging Healthily,” where each point is extensively explained. Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia.

  1. Exercise: What’s good for your heart is also good for your brain. Ensure you engage in sufficient physical activity – at least 2.5 hours per week is ideal.
  2. Mental Fitness: Keep learning new things, even as you age. This keeps your brain active. Whether it’s learning a musical instrument, a new language, or computer skills, try something new.
  3. Healthy Diet: Follow the traditional Mediterranean diet. Consume plenty of fruits and vegetables, olive oil, and nuts. Choose fish over red meat.
  4. Social Connections: Activities are more enjoyable when done with others, and they stimulate your brain. Schedule workouts, music sessions, card games, or cooking sessions with friends.
  5. Weight Management: Be mindful of your weight. A healthy diet and regular exercise help maintain a healthy weight.
  6. Adequate Sleep: Ensure you get quality and sufficient sleep to allow your brain to eliminate toxins and recover.
  7. No Smoking: Smoking is harmful to your brain. Quit smoking – it’s never too late.
  8. Avoid Head Injuries: Be cautious in your daily activities and sports to protect your head, for instance, by wearing a helmet while cycling.
  9. Monitor Blood Pressure: Regularly check your blood pressure. High blood pressure should be treated.
  10. Check for Diabetes: Keep an eye on your blood sugar levels. If they remain consistently high, take action in consultation with your doctor.
  11. Treat Depression: Take good care of yourself. If you feel persistently lethargic or depressed, it’s wise to consult your doctor to identify the cause. Depression should not go untreated.
  12. Watch for Hearing Loss: Take hearing loss seriously. With a hearing aid, you can correct declining hearing effectively.

Original source: This information was Initially covered by focus.de and has been translated for our readers.


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